New – Chambord, 1939-1945

From November 21, Chambord explores the fate of works of art in times of conflict through a new permanent tour dedicated to the life of the monument during the Second World War, a part of its history as little known as it is striking.

In 1939, in order to preserve them from the bombings and the covetousness of the Nazis, thousands of works were sent in convoys to eleven castles and abbeys in central and western France, including Chambord. were sent in convoys to eleven castles and abbeys in central and western France, including Chambord. The castle, which was closed to the public, housed thousands of works of art, mostly from French French public collections. Chambord will thus become the largest repository in France. Iconic works, such as such as Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Delacroix’s Liberty Guiding the People and The Lady with the Unicorn, have been hidden in Chambord.

This new space, accessible from the castle’s terraces, highlights the role played by the monument in the preservation of the treasures of humanity, in the spirit of UNESCO, which included it on its World Heritage List in 1981. list in 1981. Thanks to an innovative mediation, the visit, which will lift the veil on an episode of the life of Chambord’s life, will appeal to all audiences, including the youngest.

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